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Global News: Toronto police wearing baseball caps over staffing concerns: union

Published September 14, 2017

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CP24: Toronto police union announces second phase of job action

Published September 14, 2017

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Toronto Sun: Toronto cops wear hats in protest of 'low morale'

Published September 14, 2017

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Did you know?

Toronto Police are facing an alarming series of cuts that affect police staffing. These cuts continue to weaken Toronto police officers’ ability to keep the city safe, engage proactively with the community and deliver policing to parts of the city where it matters most.

You can throw your support behind Toronto’s officers by joining us on Facebook and sending a message to Chief Saunders, Mayor John Tory and Toronto Police Services Board Chair Andy Pringle. It’s time for politicians to put public safety ahead of their cost-cutting agendas and reinvest in frontline community policing.

The Issues at heart

Too Few Officers On The Front Lines

As of July 2017, The Toronto Police Service employs around 5100 police officers. That’s almost 500 officers lost since 2010, with a reduction of another 400 officers planned. This will bring the Toronto Police Service down to 4,766 officers by 2019, an almost 20% decrease compared to 2010 staffing levels.

Many divisions are struggling to fill even half of the needed patrol cars at the start of the shift. It is not uncommon, for 42 Division for example, Toronto’s largest police Division stretching from Victoria Park Avenue on the west, to Pickering Townline on the east, Steeles Avenue on the north and Highway 401 on the south, to cover an entire division with almost 300,000 residents with three or four patrol cars.

Quite simply, we now don’t have enough police officers to meet demand.

Too Few Officers On The Front Lines

As of July 2017, The Toronto Police Service employs around 5100 police officers. That’s almost 500 officers lost since 2010, with a reduction of another 400 officers planned. This will bring the Toronto Police Service down to 4,766 officers by 2019, an almost 20% decrease compared to 2010 staffing levels.

Many divisions are struggling to fill even half of the needed patrol cars at the start of the shift. It is not uncommon, for 42 Division for example, Toronto’s largest police Division stretching from Victoria Park Avenue on the west, to Pickering Townline on the east, Steeles Avenue on the north and Highway 401 on the south, to cover an entire division with almost 300,000 residents with three or four patrol cars.

Quite simply, we now don’t have enough police officers to meet demand.

Service Levels are Falling

Toronto’s police officers frequently face a severe backlog of pending radio calls as soon as they arrive on shift – leaving insufficient units available to respond to emergencies. As a result, 911 response times are getting longer, putting citizens at risk when they need help the most. And it should be no surprise that as of December 10, 2017, overall crime has increased in fourteen of Toronto’s seventeen police divisions. Robbery has increased by 9% across the city, with some divisions experiencing robbery increases as high as 50%.

Toronto officers know there is a direct link between this chronic understaffing, decreased intelligence-gathering ability, and increasing crime.

Officers Are Burning Out And Walking Away

Frontline members tell us that they have been forced back into a reactive policing mode, bouncing from call to call, which is dangerous for victims of crime and Toronto police officers themselves. TPA members are resigning in record numbers as they leave for police services that are appropriately staffed and where citizens needs and officer health and wellness are priorities. In fact, 152 members have resigned so far this year, 65 of whom left for police services nearby.

Community policing is a priority for our members but we recognize that it takes resources, financial and human, to get it right. How come Toronto is getting it so wrong?

Officers Are Burning Out And Walking Away

Frontline members tell us that they have been forced back into a reactive policing mode, bouncing from call to call, which is dangerous for victims of crime and Toronto police officers themselves. TPA members are resigning in record numbers as they leave for police services that are appropriately staffed and where citizens needs and officer health and wellness are priorities. In fact, 152 members have resigned so far this year, 65 of whom left for police services nearby.

Community policing is a priority for our members but we recognize that it takes resources, financial and human, to get it right. How come Toronto is getting it so wrong?

A Critical Loss of Confidence

The feedback from both our civilian and uniform membership is clear and compelling. All of our members are bearing the full brunt of the change the Service has undertaken in an attempt to decrease their budget, masked as modernizing the Toronto Police Service through the Transformational Task Force. Fully 75% of our members believe this is not in the public’s best interest.

Due to the ongoing hiring freeze, members are being asked to take on more and more responsibilities – 93% of our members believe the Service is under-resourced. Our civilian members are being threatened with job losses and contracting out their work. Requests for help are going unaddressed. Members are being forced by management to do more with less, putting them under unprecedented stress and pressure to maintain acceptable levels of service and support.

The Numbers That Matter

The number of officers in Toronto has been slashed to crisis levels. During peak calls for service, areas of our city have little to no police coverage.

Looking for more information on policing, crime, and public safety statistics? Please visit the Toronto Police Service’s Public Safety Data Portal.

How To Contact The Toronto Police Services Board

The Toronto Police Services Board needs to start listening. Not to police critics, but to frontline officers.

Cuts to police will affect your community. If you agree that we need to Stop the Toronto Police Cuts please join us on Facebook or click here to send your views to the Toronto Police Services Board

CLICK HERE TO CONTACT THE TPSB NOW

About the TPA

The Toronto Police Association (“TPA”) was officially incorporated as a non-profit organization on December 3, 1956. Throughout its existence the TPA’s fundamental purpose has been to “protect those who protect others” and to promote the interests of its members in a variety of spheres. READ MORE

Contact Us

200-2075 Kennedy Rd,
Toronto, ON M1T 3V3, Canada
Tel: 416-491-4301
Fax: 416-494-4948
Email: information@tpa.ca